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LTA Connect: Designing and assessing collaborative work

Professor Keith Smyth of the Learning and Teaching Academy spoke about how to tackle the challenges in the design and assessment of collaborative work including: how to manage collaborative work and make group working ‘visible’; how to fairly assess joint reports or other outputs; and how to assess or recognise what the individual has learned – including the broader skills they have developed – through participating in collaborative work.

When Apr 06, 2017 to Apr 06, 2017
from 12pm
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Outline

While collaborative work offers many educational benefits for students, including taking on more complex projects and learning to work effectively with others, it is also brings with it certain challenges. These can include: how to manage collaborative work and make group working ‘visible’; how to fairly assess joint reports or other outputs; and how to assess or recognise what the individual has learned – including the broader skills they have developed – through participating in collaborative work.

This webinar explored these and other common challenges in the design and assessment of collaborative work. Here we are defining ‘collaborative work’ fairly broadly to include joint projects as well as engagement in other activities (e.g. seminars and online discussion) where students have a role to play in contributing to the collective learning experience. A range of practical examples from different subject areas was presented and discussed, alongside the opportunity for participants to share what they have found to be effective within their own contexts. The role that specific educational technologies can play in supporting effective collaborate working was highlighted throughout.

Resources

Webinar recording

Presenter

Keith Smyth is Professor of Pedagogy at the university, and leads the Learning and Teaching Academy. Keith works with colleagues across the university on strategic learning and teaching developments, funded projects and supporting staff to engage in educational research. Much of this work is taken forward through the activities of the LTA. Keith has particular interests in co-creative pedagogies and curriculum models, open education, technology-enhanced learning, educational strategy and policy, and developing pedagogic research and scholarship. He has written and presented widely in these areas, and has undertaken funded projects for organisations including the Higher Education Academy, Jisc, Scottish Funding Council and NHS.