Cyber Awareness

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The nature and style of cyber threats to everyone changes on a regular basis. The university works closely with partners across the country to help you stay safe when new threats are identified.

Police Scotland produce regular guidance and information in relation to the latest known cyber scams, as well as provide up to the minute safety tips to help identify these when you are working online. This information comes from various government agencies such as the National Cyber Security Centre.

Latest News – January 2021

Cyber Scotland Week January 2021 Bulletin

Lockdown Home Working Guidance – Police Scotland content

Lockdown Home Working Guidance – Police Scotland

Lockdown Home Working Guidance – Police Scotland

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Home Working

As we once again move into lockdown and remote working becoming more prevalent across the business sector we wanted to reiterate the following guidance to ensure a safer cyber secure working environment.

We recommend you read the NCSC guidance to prepare your staff for remote working. This covers the essential recommendations for businesses to protect their information with a useful infographic.

Using Personal Devices for Work

If staff are using their own devices to connect to your network please ensure you are conversant with the NCSC guidance.

Phishing Emails

During the previous lockdown there was an increase in online cyber related crime. We recommend your staff are aware of the signs of Phishing emails and have the knowledge to recognise and report such emails by looking at our guidance.

Staff Training

It is important that staff understand their roles and responsibilities in regards to Cybercrime prevention and it may be prudent to reaffirm staff training and update security protocols during this period. You can access free staff training and ensure updates are enacted promptly on all devices.

The wellbeing of staff is also important at this time and it is incumbent on managers to support staff during the period and ensure any Cyber related concerns are addressed timeously with privileged access levels to confidential information being reviewed as required. Free online staff training is available from the NCSC.

Business Email Compromise

(BEC) is a form of phishing attack, typically a cybercriminal will send a fake invoice or request for payment information to be updated. Another tactic is sending an email posing as a manager or CEO within a company.Always be sceptical of urgent and hurried requests to transfer/pay invoices. Verify these requests using known contacts.The National Cyber Security Centre have produced an infographic that outlines this security threat and actions to take to avoid BEC.

VIDEO CONFERENCING

As businesses move to a more Cyber resilient footing video conferencing will become more prevalent in everyday work. Guidance on Video Conferencing is available on NCSC.

If you have been a victim of crime, and it is not an ongoing emergency, you can report this to Police Scotland on 101. For all emergency calls, dial 999.

This alert was sent out for your information by Police Scotland
Cybercrime Harm Prevention Unit - PPCWCyberHarmPrevention@Scotland.pnn.police.uk
All information was correct at time of distribution. 07/01/2021.

Computer Software Service Fraud – Police Scotland content

Computer Software Service Fraud – Police Scotland

Computer Software Service Fraud – Police Scotland

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Fraudsters are cold calling victims, or using a ‘pop up’ windows on your web browser, purporting to be from well-known IT companies or broadband providers, claiming that the victim has problems with their computers, routers, or internet connection. The criminals persuades the victim to download software to their computer or laptop and connect via a Remote Access Tool (RAT), allowing the criminals to gain access to the victim’s computer or mobile phone. Victims are persuaded to log into their online banking to receive a refund as a form of compensation, allowing the criminals access to the victim’s bank account, and the ability to move funds out of the victims account.

There has also been an increase in the variety of service providers being impersonated to commit these scams.

Always remember:

  • Ensure you have effective and updated antivirus/antispyware software and firewall running whenever your computer or mobile device is switched on.
  • Never install any software, or grant remote access to your computer, because of a cold call.
  • Do not be tempted to download programs or apps that are not from a trusted source, as they could contain malware (malicious software).
  • Genuine organisations would never contact you out of the blue to ask you for personal or financial details, such as your Bank card PIN or full banking password.
  • Don’t contact companies promoting technical support services via web browser pop-ups.
  • Hang up on any callers who claim they can get your money back for you.
  • Cover your webcam when not in use.
  • Regularly back up your data.

If your device has been infected or you have been a victim:

  • If you have made a payment, contact your bank immediately. They can help you prevent any further losses.
  • Disconnect your device from the network as soon as possible in order to prevent further malicious activity.
  • If you granted remote access to your computer, seek technical support to remove any unwanted software. If you need technical advice, look for reviews online first or ask friends for recommendations.
  • If you think the infection has been removed change the passwords of your online accounts and check your banking activity and report anything unusual to your bank.

For more information on how you can protect yourself online, visit the Cyber Aware webpage and the Take Five Stop Fraud website.

If you have been a victim of crime and it is not an ongoing emergency, you can report this to Police Scotland on 101. For all emergency calls, dial 999.

This alert was sent out for your information by Police Scotland
Cybercrime Harm Prevention Unit - PPCWCyberHarmPrevention@Scotland.pnn.police.uk
All information was correct at time of distribution. 07/01/2021.

Parents and Carers CEOP – Police Scotland content

Parents and Carers CEOP – Police Scotland

Parents and Carers CEOP – Police Scotland

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Online safety

The internet is an amazing place for children to learn, create, have fun, game and communicate with friends, but they may occasionally have to deal with a variety of related challenging issues being Online can bring and there are positive things you as a Parent or Carer can do to equip yourself to support your child or young person if they face such issues.

As a Parent or Carer, there is support there to enhance your children or young persons’ safety and security Online, such as the links below, which are very informative, easy to follow and will also open up the opportunity for you to start the discussion about online safety.

Thinkuknow is the online safety education programme from the National Crime Agency (NCA) and their website has home activity packs from the ages of 4yrs to 14+yrs to take support from.

CEOP, NSPCC and Internet Matters, at the links below, have created a number of fantastic free to use advice hubs to help you learn more to support you and your child or young person with Online issues:

As we are now in a new lockdown and education establishments are closed, our children and young people will be spending more time Online, so as a parent or carer please take time to enhance your knowledge in terms of the support that is available to protect your child or young person in the Online world.

You can report suspicious emails by forwarding the original message to the Suspicious Email Reporting Service (SERS) at report@phishing.gov.uk

If you receive a suspicious text you can forward this to 7726 which spells SPAM on your key pad.

If you have been a victim of crime, and it is not an ongoing emergency, you can report this to Police Scotland on 101. For all emergency calls, dial 999.

This alert was sent out for your information by Police Scotland
Cybercrime Harm Prevention Unit - PPCWCyberHarmPrevention@Scotland.pnn.police.uk
All information was correct at time of distribution. 07/01/2021.

Parcel Scams Targeting Chinese Students – Police Scotland content

Parcel Scams Targeting Chinese Students – Police Scotland

Parcel Scams Targeting Chinese Students – Police Scotland

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 Police Scotland has been notified of a fraud or scam that is affecting Chinese students living and studying in Scotland.

Students have been contacted by telephone, by an unknown person claiming that an illegal parcel addressed to them, has been intercepted by DHL and that they are required to pay a fine.
Students are thereafter contacted via social networking applications and coerced into transferring large amounts of money into various bank accounts in China. On some occasions, the fraudster(s) have claimed to be a Police officer from China and have appeared on video calls dressed in Police uniform in an effort to present as genuine.

Take Five to Stop Fraud

Criminals are experts at impersonating people, organisations and the police. They spend hours researching you for their scams, hoping you’ll let your guard down for just a moment. Stop and think. It could protect you and your money.

Stop
Taking a moment to stop and think before parting with your money or information could keep you safe.

Challenge
Could it be fake? It’s ok to reject, refuse or ignore any requests. Only criminals will try to rush or panic you.

Protect
Contact your bank immediately if you think you’ve fallen for a scam and report it to Police Scotland.

 

Please be aware and take the following steps to protect yourself:

• Do not give out any personal information or credit card/ banking details over the telephone. No genuine caller will ever ask you to do this.
• If in doubt about who is calling, hang up and find the advertised contact details for that agency. Do not redial the telephone number used to call you.
• Do not click on any attachments or links provided in an email or text message.

If you think you have been a victim of a telephone or online fraud contact your bank immediately and report any suspicious activity to Police Scotland on 101 or 999 in the case of an emergency.


For further information about keeping safe, please our website:

https://www.scotland.police.uk/keep-safe/personal-safety/

www.scotland.police.uk/takefive

General fraud information is available from the Chinese Consulate website:

http://edinburgh.china-consulate.org/chn/zytz/t1752175.htm

 

Stop challenge protect | take five to stop fraud | Police Scotland

Telephone Scams Targeting Chinese Students – Police Scotland content

Telephone Scams Targeting Chinese Students – Police Scotland

Telephone Scams Targeting Chinese Students – Police Scotland

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Police Scotland has been notified of a fraud or scam that is affecting Chinese students living and studying in Scotland.

The students have been telephoned by someone pretending to be from a Chinese government office or police department who asks for money to be transferred online to a given bank account.


Please be aware and take the following steps to protect yourself:

• Do not give out any personal information or credit card/ banking details over the telephone. No genuine caller will ever ask you to do this.

• If in doubt about who is calling, hang up and find the advertised contact details for that agency. Do not redial the telephone number used to call you.

• Do not click on any attachments or links provided in an email or text message.

 

If you think you have been a victim of a telephone or online fraud contact your bank immediately and report to Police Scotland on 101 or 999 in an emergency

General fraud information is available from the Chinese Consulate website.
http://edinburgh.china-consulate.org/chn/zytz/t1752175.htm