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Ms Mairi Stewart



Ms Mairi Stewartmairi.stewart@uhi.ac.uk

Since joining the Centre in April 2006, Ms Stewart has worked on two ongoing Centre projects, a history of Highland sporting estates and an oral history of forestry. Prior to this she was Project Officer for the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) Research Centre for Environmental History at the University of Stirling, where she took part in a four-year interdisciplinary programme under the theme of 'Waste and Wasteland'.  Ms Stewart had project management responsibilities for this programme and worked on three of the programme’s projects. In the mid-1990s, by which point she had spent more than ten years developing and managing environmental projects, Ms Stewart undertook an MPhil research degree under the supervision of Prof T. C. Smout at the University of St Andrews. Her thesis dealt with the utilisation and management of the semi-natural woodlands of Lochtayside, 1650-1850. She has since published in several environmental history media.

Among her publications are two chapters in T. C. Smout (ed), People and Woods in Scotland: A History, (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2003). With Fiona Watson, she has also published Mar Lodge Estate: Its Woods and People, (Edinburgh: National Trust for Scotland, 2004). In September 2007, Ms Stewart gave a paper on woods as an element of cultural landscapes at an international Forest History Conference in Thessaloniki, Greece.  She is joint organiser of the Scottish Woodland History Discussion Group.


Ms Stewart has been involved in range of environmental history projects. These include an interdisciplinary investigation of past uses of urban natural resources, working with soil scientists; an examination of the historic context to contemporary perceptions of the value of the British uplands; and a project focusing on transhumance in Spain and Scotland.  She has a special interest in woodland and forest history, on which she has published extensively.