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CNS PhD Seminar by Andrea Blendl

This is the second seminar in our new PhD seminar series, which runs between February 24 and April 7. It will be transmitted via VC and you will be able to connect via Jabber. By attending these seminars you will get a chance to get to know our PhD students as well as listen to and learn about their ongoing work. Presentations will last between 20 and 40 minutes, leaving some time for discussion at the end. Those of you who would like to attend, please contact us by the Monday of the week of each seminar so that we can notify VC master as well as sending out Jabber codes
When Mar 10, 2017
from 12:00 PM to 01:00 PM
Where CNS Kiln Corner, Kirkwall, or via VC
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This week's seminar, presented by Andrea Blendl, is entitled Runic writing in the diaspora: Expression of a Norse identity?

My PhD research re-evaluates the runic inscriptions in Orkney and the surrounding Western Norse diaspora as expressions of identities. This project, funded by an ARCS studentship, focuses on a comparative study of the corpus of runic inscriptions from the entire Scandinavian diaspora in the North Atlantic region, and looks at runic literacy as a means of expressing identity in the Viking diaspora. Runic writing is found in areas of Northern Europe inhabited by Germanic speaking peoples. In Britain, we find two types of runic script: that of the Anglo-Saxons and that of the Scandinavians. Orkney Museum is involved as a non-academic partner, as Orkney is the heart of the Viking Age and medieval Scandinavian colonies in Scotland, and home to Britain’s largest assemblage of runic inscriptions. With the major corpus of inscriptions in Orkney at its centre, the project is not restricted to examining material from Orkney, but takes the whole Viking diaspora into account. Editions and evaluations of the runic corpus tend to focus on certain regions and seldom examine connections throughout the Scandinavian diaspora in-depth. By interpreting runic inscriptions as witness of an extended network of literacy across the North Atlantic the project seeks to establish connections and larger patterns of common traits, and examine cultural and linguistic exchange with other cultures inhabiting the region. This research has a natural place within the growing field of research on the Viking diaspora, also taking into account recent work on Gaelic influence on Viking culture, language and place-names as well as DNA studies and key archaeological features. This makes it possible to view the Viking settlement of the North Atlantic Isles from a new perspective which has not been fully explored so far and will shed light on the growing area of Viking diaspora research from a new angle.

CNS PhD Seminar by Cait McCullagh (UHI and Herriot Watt)

You are all warmly invited to attend the third of our PhD seminars. It will be transmitted via VC and you will be able to connect via Jabber. By attending these seminars you will get a chance to get to know our PhD students as well as listen to and learn about their ongoing work. Presentations will last between 20 and 40 minutes, leaving some time for discussion at the end. Those of you who would like to attend, please contact us by the Monday of the week of each seminar so that I can notify VC master as well as sending out Jabber codes.
When Mar 17, 2017
from 12:00 PM to 01:00 PM
Where CNS Kiln Corner, Kirkwall, or via VC
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This week's seminar will be held by, Cait McCullagh, on the topic of: Through the co-curation looking glass - ‘re-viewing’ fragility and envisioning sustainable futures: Early PhD findings on communities’ curating maritime heritage in Scotland's Northern Isles

This paper presents first findings from my PhD project, commenced in November 2016.  Aiming to increase visibility and access to Orkney and Shetland’s maritime heritages this practice-based research includes co-curating a virtual learning and exhibition environment.

Reflecting heritage’s participative turn, co-curation transgresses boundaries and reveals blockades between cultural 'authenticity' and living tradition and between digital and embodied experiences. This early assessment considers the constraints and freedoms encountered when proposing collaborative interpretation and management of heritage once set adrift and now dispersed throughout various community dwellings including museums, boat sheds, marine environments and households.

Sharing findings from encounters in these settings, I am considering the visible and opaque dialogues between the diverse ‘inhabitants’ in the co-curation process, including makers, curators, sea-farers and 'objects of the sea’.  The study promotes questions: Is subversion of ‘Authorised Heritage Discourse a valid process for generating communities’ creative and critical responses to fragility? What can we learn about the role of heritage as a mirror to communities’ processes of entanglement, exclusivity, specificity and cohesion? Might co-curation offer a transparent, empirical model for envisioning sustainable futures?

CNS PhD Seminar by Jane Blair MacMorran

You are all warmly invited to attend our PhD seminars, which will be transmitted via VC and you will be able to connect via Jabber. By attending these seminars you will get a chance to get to know our PhD students as well as listen to and learn about their ongoing work. Presentations will last between 20 and 40 minutes, leaving some time for discussion at the end. Those of you who would like to attend, please contact me us by the Monday of the week of each seminar so that we can notify VC master as well as sending out Jabber codes.
When Mar 24, 2017
from 12:00 PM to 01:00 PM
Where CNS Kiln Corner, Kirkwall, or via VC
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The Musical Legacy of Ron Gonnella, Scottish Fiddler (1930-1994)

My intent with this thesis is to show that Ron Gonnella participated in a lifelong dialogue between musical text and social context and that his contributions influenced the character of what is considered traditional Scottish fiddling today. This thesis is also a dialogue between people who knew, studied, worked or performed with Gonnella, as well as those who were informed by his work or simply held opinions about his playing, as expressed through my personal interviews.

This thesis examines and positions the musical legacy of Ron Gonnella in a wider historical and social context through the perceptions of different communities of listeners.  This approach differs from typical musicological analyses in that it considers Gonnella’s body of work as text and rejects the notions that meaning resides in the musical text or that it exists in a cultural or social vacuum. Literary theorist Stanley Fish provides an added dimension to the study of Gonnella’s work. Fish’s idea of the authority of interpretive communities contributes perspectives on his acceptance—or rejection—by audiences on both sides of the Atlantic and provides the structural framework for this thesis.

CNS PhD Seminar by Lydia Crow

You are all warmly invited to attend our PhD seminar series, which will be transmitted via VC and you will be able to connect via Jabber. By attending these seminars you will get a chance to get to know our PhD students as well as listen to and learn about their ongoing work. Presentations will last between 20 and 40 minutes, leaving some time for discussion at the end. Those of you who would like to attend, please contact us by the Monday of the week of each seminar so that we can notify VC master as well as sending out Jabber codes.
When Apr 07, 2017
from 12:00 PM to 01:00 PM
Where CNS Kiln Corner, Kirkwall, or via VC
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This week Lydia Crow will be speaking about: Folklore, Social Media, and Expressions of Identity Relating to Orkney.