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Mental health and wellbeing in the Scottish islands: A review of the literature content

Mental health and wellbeing in the Scottish islands: A review of the literature

This literature review was commissioned by the Scottish Government in 2021 as part of its £1.3 million Healthy Island Fund (HIF).

The review was undertaken by Janet Heaton in the Division of Rural Health and Wellbeing, Institute of Health, Social Care and Innovation, at the University of the Highlands and Islands (UHI), in conjunction with the Scottish Rural Health Partnership (SRHP), from January to April 2022. The searches of academic databases, and location of more difficult to retrieve items, were done with support from Chris O'Malley, Highland Health Sciences Library, Centre for Health Science, Inverness.

The main aim of this literature review was to describe the state of the art of research on mental health and wellbeing in the Scottish islands. A mapping review was conducted to profile research activity in relation to six island.

A total of 80 works, linked to 53 studies published between 1977 and 2022, were identified with relevant content on the topics of mental health and wellbeing that was attributable to one or more of the Scottish islands. The works were comprised of 38 journal articles, 34 reports, two book chapters, and six PhD theses.

The full report is available by clicking on the link below: 

 Mental wellbeing review FINAL report

 

TEC Pathfinder Project Workshop – Respiratory Care in the Highlands content

TEC Pathfinder Project Workshop – Respiratory Care in the Highlands

Highland is one of four areas within Scotland chosen to be a TEC Pathfinder and test the Scottish Approach to Service Design (SAtSD). The Highland pathfinder project focuses on people living with respiratory symptoms or conditions. The project team is drawn from NHS Highland, the Third Sector (including Chest Heart and Stroke Scotland and LGOWIT) and the University of the Highlands and Islands Division of Rural Health and Wellbeing.

The project team carried out primary research (interviews, focus groups and questionnaires) and reviewed existing evidence from other studies in order to understand what it’s like to be someone living with respiratory symptoms and/or a diagnosed respiratory condition within Highland. They also researched what it’s like to be a carer or healthcare professional involved in the diagnosis, treatment and care of someone living with respiratory symptoms and/or a respiratory condition within Highland.

The following four areas were prioritised as areas for potential change and improvement:

  1. Patients need improved access to support, sign-posting and self-management throughout the patient journey.
  2. Data needs to be where it is needed, at the time it is needed, by patients, healthcare professionals and others.
  3. GPs need increased knowledge and information on respiratory conditions and referral processes.
  4. Patients need increased understanding and information about their condition and their pathway/journey, especially at ‘stress’ points.

A recent stakeholder workshop asked people to consider these four areas and suggest what change should look like. Just over 50 people attended the workshop from primary and secondary care, academia, the third sector and patients. These ideas will be developed over the coming months by a series of working groups.

If you missed the workshop, you can watch a recording of the two plenary sessions: 1) Introduction to the project and 2) feedback on ideas.

Further information: Sarah-Anne.munoz@uhi.ac.uk

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